The Deschutes National Forest, Discover Your Forest, and OSU-Cascades are partnering to offer educational opportunities for OSU-Cascades Students and the public. A lecture series called “The Greatest Good” will feature presentations from land managers and specialists from the Deschutes National Forest on a variety of topics in natural resources.

The lecture Series begins October 2017 and will be held the second Thursday of each month through March of next year.

Each lecture will take place at 4:00 p.m. in OSU-Cascade’s Tykeson Hall Room 207.

All lectures are free and open to the public.

For more information on the lecture series, please contact Rika Ayotte at 541-383-5572.   Also visit the sponsors’ lecture series pages:
Deschutes National Forest

October 12 – Bend-Fort Rock District Ranger Kevin Larkin will discuss the ever-changing meanings we attribute to nature and wilderness and wilderness planning efforts underway on the Deschutes and Willamette National Forests.

November 9 – Wildlife Biologist Lauri Turner will talk about How Human Disturbance Impacts Wildlife from communication barriers to fragmentation and at times even death.

December 14 – Geologist Bart Wills will give a presentation briefly discussing the geology of Newberry, the 40-year geothermal history, the formation of the Newberry National Volcanic Monument, some of the difficulties is producing geothermal power, and the most recent geothermal projects.

January 11 – Fisheries Biologist, Jason Wilcox, will provide an overview of current and future Aquatic Invasive Species management considerations on and around the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests and the Crooked River National Grassland.

February 8 – Lisa Machnik, Recreation, Partnerships, Lands and Archaeology Staff Officer, will discuss the past, present and future of our Wild and Scenic Rivers as we celebrate 50 Years since the signing of the original legislation.

March 8th – Archaeologist Penni Borghi will present on early Inhabitants of Central Oregon and discoveries at Newberry Caldera and the complexities of archaeological sites in Central Oregon.